Ask Your Question

Revision history [back]

click to hide/show revision 1
initial version

If you run the following command against the sdc log file: grep "Driver class" * | grep <your pipeline="" name=""> | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 }'


You should see what drivers are registered with Java's Jdbc Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists: 1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible 2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you run the following command against the sdc log file: grep "Driver class" * | grep <your pipeline="" name=""> YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 }'


You should see what drivers are registered with Java's Jdbc Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists: 1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible 2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you run the following command against the sdc log file: file:

grep "Driver class" * | grep YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 }'


}'

You should see what drivers are registered with Java's Jdbc Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists: 1. exists:

  1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible 2. compatible
  2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you run the following command against the sdc log file:

grep "Driver class" * | grep YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 }'

You should see what drivers are registered with Java's Jdbc JDBC Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists:

  1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible
  2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you ensure that Data Collector's log level is set to INFO, DEBUG or TRACE, then run the following command against the sdc log file:

grep "Driver class" * | grep YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 }'

You should see what drivers are registered with Java's JDBC Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists:

  1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible
  2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you ensure that Data Collector's log level is set to INFO, DEBUG or TRACE, then run the following command against the sdc log file:

grep "Driver class" * | grep YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $12 $(NF-2) }'

You should see what drivers are registered with Java's JDBC Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists:

  1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible
  2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.

If you ensure that Data Collector's log level is set to INFO, DEBUG or TRACE, then run the following command against the sdc log file:

grep "Driver class" * | grep YOUR_PIPELINE_NAME | awk '{print $1, $2, $(NF-2) }'

You should see what drivers are registered with Java's JDBC Driver Manager. If you do not see your driver then the following potential issues exists:exist:

  1. Driver is not JDBC 3/4 compatible
  2. SDC does not have permissions to load those driver files ( file access)

As Pat mentioned, you could use the legacy driver tab to force usage of the driver by loading the class though "in general" that is not the preferred route since it will tie your pipeline to a specific driver rather than drivers provided by your admins/devops.